Joe Andriano
Professor Emeritus of 
English 



Fielding a question after his last lecture (see link below).

Griffin Hall, Univ. of Louisiana, Lafayette

Born and raised in Albany, NY,
Joseph Andriano received his Ph.D. in English
 from Washington State University in 1986,

his M. A. from Binghamton University in 1972,
and his B.A. from Stony Brook University in 1970.

After 37 years teaching,
Andriano retired from UL Lafayette in May 2016.


He was honored to give "The Last Lecture" to the University community in April 2016







Holding up a gift at his retirement party


Publications


Email




Last Updated February 2019




 
Here's a link to a photo essay on our 2017 trip to Southern Italy.

Below, from our 2018 trip to Florence, some of my favorite artistic monsters . . .




"Perseus freeing Andromeda" (c.1510) at the Uffizi.
I've always enjoyed Piero di Cosimo's grotesque depiction of the monster Cetus




Jason taking the Golden Fleece from the dragon,
at the Bargello. Pietro Francavilla, 1589




Cellini's Perseus with the Head of Medusa (c.1550)
in the Piazza della Signoria





Carravagio's Medusa (1597), the Uffizi.
The decapitated Gorgon isn't quite dead yet!

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        Selected Publications




Andriano has written two scholarly books:
  • Our Ladies of Darkness: Feminine Daemonology in Male Gothic Fiction. University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1993. Rpt. in paperback 2005. Chapter Reprints: part of chapter 3 in Short Story Criticism, vol. 20 (Gale Research, 1995): 38–41; part of chapter 4 in The Dark Fantastic, ed. C. W. Sullivan III, Greenwood Press, 1997. 49–57. 
Reviews of Immortal Monster
    Dirk Remley, Extrapolation 40.3 (Fall 1999): 261–64
    Gary Wolfe, Science Fiction Studies 27.2 (July 2000): 315–18.

Reviews of Our Ladies of Darkness:
    J. Mullan, Times Literary Supplement, Dec. 24, 1993: 7.
   H. Meyers, Studies in Short Fiction 31.3 (1994):527–28.
   S. Keen, College English 56.2 (1994): 209–16.
   D.L. Hoeveler, Journal of the History of Sexuality 4 (Apr. 1994): 638–40



Here's a selection of some articles he's written:

  • "Monsters of the Fantastic: Fusions of the Mythical and the Real." Critical Insights on the Fantastic. Ed. Claire Whitehead. Ipswich, MA: Salem Press, 2013
  • "Moby-Dick in the 21st Century: From Fossil to Rocket." Indiana English (Spring 2007):19-39.
  •  "Behemyth Evolving: Whale/Ape/Rocket." Trajectories of the Fantastic. Ed. Michael Morrison.  Westport, CT & London:  Greenwood Press, 1997.
  •  "Brother to Dragons: Race and Evolution in Moby-Dick." ATQ: 19th Century American Literature & Culture 10.2 (June 1996): 141–53.  (Univ. of Rhode Island). A large portion of this article has been reprinted in The Routledge Literary Source Book on Herman Melville's Moby-Dick. (2003)
  •  "The Masks of Gödel: Math and Myth in Gravity's Rainbow." Modes of the Fantastic. Eds. Robert Collins  and Rob   Latham.  Westport, CT & London: Greenwood Press, 1995.
  • "The Handmaid's Tale as Scrabble Game." Essays on Canadian Writing 48 (Winter 1992–93): 89–96.
  • Seven articles for Walt Whitman: An Encyclopedia. eds. J.R. LeMaster and Donald Kummings. NY: Garland, 1998.
  •    Here's a sample: his article on "A Noiseless Patient Spider"
     

  • Six articles for The Mark Twain Encyclopedia, eds. James D. Wilson and J. R. LeMaster.  New York: Garland, 1993.


His most recent short stories are
     "Robotomy."  Wild Violet Online Literary Magazine. October 2015
    "Love Not All Neighbors." 2014. The Louisiana Review. Volume 12. 11-24.
    "The Gris-Gris Cat." In the Eye. Thunder Rain Press, 2007.
    "World-Lines", Louisiana Literature 22.1 (Spring 2005): 35-54.
    "The Pound of Sinsemilla". The Emergency Almanac, Winter 2004
    "Strange Attractors." The Chattahoochee Review (DeKalb Univ.), 16.2 (Winter 1996): 87–100;
    "AugMental."  Argonaut (Austin, TX), vol. 16 (Summer 1992): 2–15.

Poetical Links

Starry Verses

Three Quantum Poems

Three Early Poems

A Villain's Villanelle




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